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Latest in Opinion


The effective ways to fight radicalism

In March 2016, when the supporters of Islamic State (IS) wanted to establish a base in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia—a town along the Libyan border—it was the local population that rose up against them and worked with the security forces to defeat and oust them. They all vehemently worked against radicalism because they felt that it …

Ruby Amatulla

Is the game changing for televised news channels?

  Years ago, when social media had not yet reached its level of dominance, I was not too excited about these new platforms being proposed. I am sure many shared my feelings at that time. However, many people from the younger generations, who are world wide web savvy, found social media to be a new …

Nebras Hameed

Everything in us is emotional

This week marks the anniversary of Yousef Shahin’s death. His death was quiet and simple, not reflective of the minutes of our lives which he had vociferously filled with his works. Works Shahin had inferred from the depths of his soul, and had run with, in order to build bridges between contradicting interpretations, without easing …

Nahed Salah

Britain needs a competiveness shake-up

I love England. Always have and always will. I am never happier than when there is a carpet of snow covering the garden and fields surrounding my country home or just out for a stroll with friends along the lush green banks of the Thames watching the swans. Peace, perfect peace! Great Britain for me …

Khalaf Al Habtoor

Turkey’s anti-Gulen campaign: strengthening militants and jihadists

A Turkish demand that Pakistan close 28 primary and secondary schools associated with controversial, self-exiled Turkish preacher Fethullah Gulen has put the government in Islamabad in a quandary as it attempts to get a grip on an education sector in which militant Islamists and jihadists figure prominently. Turkish ambassador to Pakistan S. Babur Girgin’s demand …

James Dorsey

Questions to our security systems

I’ve written before about this subject, but there is something that prompts me to ask these questions again. Are all those who criticise the regime considered opponents of the government? Are all those who are opponents of the government put in a box and dubbed “Muslim Brotherhood”? Do we consider all Brotherhood members to be …


Al-Sisi: pick your battles to win your war

One of the many difficulties facing President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi lies in his handling of Egypt’s political dynamic from a single, incredibly narrow perspective. The president has tended to deal with political incidents and opponents separately and thus appears to be incapable of visualising the full picture. Applying a repressive policy to each individual political …

Mohammed Nosseir

The Turkish coup and the mania of cockfighting fans in Egypt

The failed coup in Turkey has revealed an imbalance in the way of thinking between Islamist elites, the political Islamic current, and the military state in Egypt. If you take one look at the logic by which these “teams” analyse and react to recent events through traditional media platforms and social media networks, you will …

Walaa Gad Elkarim

Port Said emerges as Egypt’s focal point of soccer-driven protest

Port Said, the Suez Canal city associated with the worst incident in Egyptian sporting history, is emerging as a prime locus of soccer-driven protest in a country that does not brook dissent. Repeated protests in the city are laden with soccer’s tangled involvement and key role in the 2011 popular revolt that toppled president Hosni …

James Dorsey

The 6th military coup d’état in Turkey: reasons and results

The concept of a coup d’état is not new to Turkey. Friday’s event was the sixth coup d’état following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, starting with the 1960 Turkish coup d’état, then the 1971 Turkish military memorandum, followed by the 1980 Turkish coup d’état, the 1993 alleged Turkish military coup, the 1997 Turkish military …

Sayed Ghoneim

Military regimes should not be recognised 

The military upheaval in Turkey, of which the final consequences are yet to be seen, highlights a major weakness in worldwide efforts to promote democracy. This event underscores the need to establish binding international legal principles to ban the recognition of military regimes as a result of coups d’état. Establishment of such principles, and the creation …

Cesar Chelala

US adds pressure on Qatar to move on labour reform

A recently published United States (US) State Department report on human trafficking provides Qatar with yet another roadmap to counter World Cup-related international criticism of its labour regime. The State Department’s annual review serves as a warning to Qatar, as the clock ticks on an ultimatum by the International Labour Organisation (ILO). The ILO last May said that it …

James Dorsey

Dallas and Cairo: a police story

The divide separating police and citizenry in both societies, as well as the political cost of police violence, continue to expand. Why are citizens being killed rather being protected?

Amr Khalifa

Nile Cooperation akin to teamwork in sports

For any football team, you have the goal keeper, defenders, midfielders, strikers, and the coach. These entities blend together so as to secure victory for their team. Separately, they would achieve nothing, for it is through team work (cooperation) that the eleven players can face their opponents (challenges) and win. The players are organised into …

John Rao Nyaoro

Are Egyptians naturally bad─or badly ruled?

  ‘Stay home’ is the advice I often give to Egyptians who are unable to tolerate the behaviour of their fellow citizens. In Egypt, the moment a citizen steps out of his home, the wide-ranging drama that literally entails an endless list of interactions (with fellow citizens, vehicles, roads, the environment, etc) begins. The direct …

Mohammed Nosseir

Sleeping with the lions: a night in Tanzania

  It sounds crazy, but it happened. I have slept in a tent that was only a few metres away from a pack of lions. I was in the middle of the savannah of Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. If I knew that this would be my fate, I may have thought twice before travelling …

Fady Hanna

Islamic banking sound option for enterprises facing economic slump

There are mounting concerns currently being voiced by prominent organisations, such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Bank of International Settlements, over the long-term impact of the slow growth rate reported across all major economic regions from the latter part of 2015 to early this year. Significant losses in the global financial and …

Nidal Abou Zaki

Jihad v soccer: the Islamic State’s convoluted love-hate relationship

If Islamic State (IS) was serious about attacking Euro 2016, its plans clearly never materialised. Leaked transcripts of the interrogation of one of the attackers of Brussels Airport in March leave little doubt however that soccer is featured prominently on the group’s target list. So does this month’s beheading of four Syrian players in Raqqa. …

James Dorsey

Grand Hotel: a journey through time

One of the most talked about drama series this Ramadan is Grand Hotel, a show based on a Spanish series bearing the same name. Taking place in the 1950s, the show follows the story of Ali and his quest to solve the mystery of his missing sister who worked at the notorious Grand Hotel in …

Ahmed El Goarany

Even old lambs come home to roost

    History may not repeat itself very often, but when parallels are witnessed, the effects can be major and gruesome. These are tough times for many. There is the ubiquitous occurrence of major terrorism, bringing insecurity to aeroplanes and airports, train stations, entertainment clubs, and schools. There is a growing wealth concentration for a …

Michael Czinkota